The indigenous population was decimated by infectious diseases brought from Europe, for which they had no immunity.

By 1542, the Spanish Crown had created the Viceroyalty of Peru yet over the years various indigenous uprisings and rebellions indicated the level of dissatisfaction the original population felt at having their traditional way of life, identity and land interfered with by foreigners.

June, July and August are considered the driest months in the highlands and Amazon basin and are optimal for hiking and river journeys.

However, even during the rainy season in the Amazon, the rains only fall for a few hours at a time.

While many travellers come to visit the country’s most famous site, the ruins of Machu Picchu, the real Peru lies within its warm, proud inhabitants – many of whom can trace their bloodlines back to the Incas.

Whether you’re exploring the cobbled streets of Arequipa, bobbing on the floating islands of Lake Titicaca or uncovering mummies in Nazca, our Peru tours will have you feeling like a modern-day Indiana Jones. Intrepid believes half the fun of experiencing a new country is getting there, and getting around once there!

Like many other South American nations, contemporary Peru is a rich mix of the modern and the ancient.

The population is made up of Quechuans, Peruvians of Spanish descent and small groups of people from Asia, Africa and the Caribbean nations.

While certainly a scene-stealer, there are also many other reminders of the Inca throughout Peru, with the ruins at Sacsayhuaman also holding much significance.

The decline of the Incas began some time around 1532, with the arrival of Spanish colonisers, civil war and the devastating smallpox virus contributing to the instability of the once-great empire.

Where possible, Intrepid uses local transport options and traditional modes of transport - which usually carry less of an environmental impact, support small local operators and are heaps more fun.