Across the seven Muslim-majority countries and territories surveyed, a median of 68% of Muslims said they view Westerners as selfish.

But most Americans do see widespread support for extremism among Muslims living in the U. Overall, 40% say there is not much support for extremism among U. Muslims, while an additional 15% say there is none at all. In most cases, the prevailing view is that “just some” or “very few” Muslims support ISIS, but in Italy, 46% say “many” or “most” do.

About a quarter say there is a fair amount of support (24%) for extremism among U. The same survey asked Europeans whether they viewed Muslims favorably or unfavorably.

Yet many facts about Muslims are not well known in some of these places, and most Americans – who live in a country with a relatively small Muslim population – have said they know little or nothing about Islam.

Here are answers to some key questions about Muslims, compiled from several Pew Research Center reports published in recent years: There were 1.8 billion Muslims in the world as of 2015 – roughly 24% of the global population – according to a Pew Research Center estimate.

But while Islam is currently the world’s second-largest religion (after Christianity), it is the fastest-growing major religion.

Indeed, if current demographic trends continue, the number of Muslims is expected to exceed the number of Christians by the end of this century.

Indonesia is currently the country with the world’s largest Muslim population, but Pew Research Center projects that India will have that distinction by the year 2050 (while remaining a majority-Hindu country), with more than 300 million Muslims. This is based on an analysis of census statistics and data from a 2017 survey of U. Muslims, which was conducted in English as well as Arabic, Farsi and Urdu.

The Muslim population in Europe also is growing; we project 10% of all Europeans will be Muslims by 2050. Based on the same analysis, Pew Research Center also estimates that there are 2.15 million Muslim adults in the country, and that a majority of them (58%) are immigrants.

Muslims are the fastest-growing religious group in the world.

The growth and regional migration of Muslims, combined with the ongoing impact of the Islamic State (also known as ISIS or ISIL) and other extremist groups that commit acts of violence in the name of Islam, have brought Muslims and the Islamic faith to the forefront of the political debate in many countries.

But views toward Muslims (as well as several of the other groups) are now warmer than they were a few years ago; in 2014, U. adults gave Muslims an average rating of 40 degrees in a similar survey. In addition, a December 2016 survey found that more Republicans than Democrats say Islam is likelier than other religions to encourage violence among its believers (63% vs. And while most Americans (69%) believe there is a lot of discrimination against Muslims in the U. today, views are again split by party: 85% of Democrats and those who lean Democratic and 49% of Republicans and GOP leaners hold this view.